“I married my wife on the K1 Visa, I already have a green card, but now after a year we’re divorced, live in different states. Can I remove the conditions on my green card?”

After you arrive in the United States on a K-1 visa, you will receive a conditional green card. This conditional green card must be renewed after two years. The same conditional green card will be issued if your marriage is less than two years old when you arrive on a spousal visa. 

A conditional green card expires after two years and it’s a little different than a standard green card renewal in that you have to prove once again that yours was a legitimate marriage. So back to your question was what if we got divorced, can I now remove those conditions? The short answer is yes. The long answer is you’re going to have a little more work to have those conditions removed. 

So it’s absolutely possible. In fact, it’s somewhat typical. So lots of people have successfully done it. You will just have to convince them that you did get married, you did co-habitat, you did live together, you did really make a genuine effort, it was a genuine relationship, you really tried it, but for whatever reason, it just didn’t work out.

If your marriage was in good shape at the time of filing for removal of conditions, and during the waiting period, you end up needing a divorce, it’s still possible to remove conditions. See this article for more information.

Importantly, if there was domestic abuse during your relationship, your green card conditions will also be removed. Make sure that you keep records and documents, and submit them with the application.

Disclaimer: The contents of this post were accurate to the best of our knowledge at the time of publishing. Immigration is constantly changing, and old information often becomes outdated, including procedures, timelines, prices, and more. Take note of the publish date. For archival purposes, these posts will remain published, even if new information renders them obsolete. Do not make important life decisions based on this content. No part of this post should be considered legal advice, as RapidVisa is not a law firm. This content is provided free of charge for informational purposes only. If anything herein conflicts with an official government website, the official government website shall prevail.

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