Page 3 of the ‘CR1 Spousal Visa’ Category

Here you will find frequently updated information about getting your CR1 Visa, and immigrating to the United States to join your husband or wife. Don’t forget to visit our Spousal Visa Overview page if you haven’t already.

02Oct2018

Notarized 3rd Party Affidavit: Evidence of Bona Fide Marriage?

In the spousal visa process, the USCIS is trying to determine that you have a bona fide marriage. And, if you have just recently married most people understandably don’t have many of the typical bona fides, such as a joint checking account, a joint lease or mortgage, joint health insurance, etc.

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27Sep2018

How Long is the CR1 Spousal Visa Taking in 2020?

Prior to our current era of “extreme vetting“, we were seeing times of six to seven months for a CR1 visa, from the time you mailed it so the USCIS until the time that you had the visa in hand. But now, in 2020, our average timelines have increased to an average of 7-10 months.

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25Sep2018

How Soon Can I Reapply After Denial? (K1 Fiance/CR1 Spousal Visa)

In the case of a fiance or spousal visa, it usually can take two to three months for the embassy to send your case back to the National Visa Center (NVC) and then the National Visa Center sends your case back to the USCIS where they’ll review your case again.

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04Sep2018

I Just Received My NVC Letter. How Long Until the Interview?

Back a year or two ago, this used to take four to six weeks. Unfortunately, they are scrutinizing petitions more so now than they have in the past. The National Visa Center is also backlogged with cases, so you’re probably looking at about four to eight weeks right now, maybe even a little bit longer.

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27Aug2018

How Long Do I Have to Pay the NVC (After USCIS Approval)?

Once a petition’s approved by the USCIS, you’ll get an invoice from the NVC by email. It’s going to take a few weeks, could take up to a month before you get it. But, once you get it, you actually have up to a year. Obviously you don’t want to wait that long.

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31Jul2018

Will a Discrepancy On My Birth Certificate Be a Problem? (Fiance/Spousal Visa)

On a fiance visa, your birth certificate is not required until the end of the process when you go to your medical exam and your interview at the U.S. Embassy. You do have some time to correct this birth certificate. You can go to your local civil office and you can have these documents corrected.

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17Jul2018

Immigrant vs. Non-Immigrant “Intent” (U.S. Visas)

What's the difference between immigrant and non-immigrant "intent"? The type of visa is determined by the purpose of the travel to the United States. Immigrant Visa An immigrant visa is for someone that intends to immigrate to the US or permanently live in the United States. Most immigrant visas have a path to citizenship after a number […]

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14Jul2018

New Policy: Trump Admin Will Deny Rather Than Issue RFEs

In a disturbing memo issued by USCIS (PM-602-0163) on July 13, 2018, we were made aware of a new policy which will make it much easier for the Trump Administration to issue denials for legal immigration cases across the board (with the exception of DACA), including fiance visas, spousal visas, green card applications and more.

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11Jul2018

What is “Administrative Processing”? (Visa Applications)

For various reasons, some of which you may never really find out, your case, you may get an update from the State Department that tells you your case is in “Administrative Processing“, or AP. What that means in terms of immigration matters, is that there is something about your case that they don’t like, so they’re going to take a little longer to look at your case.

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06Jul2018

Does Income Matter at the Embassy Phase? Gross or Adjusted Gross?

“Once the USCIS and NVC approves the case, and the case is mailed out to the beneficiary’s local embassy for interview, should the interviewer still look at adjusted gross income or gross income?”

For the fiance visa, absolutely. Because they don’t even look at income until the embassy.

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