Page 6 of the ‘Adjustment of Status’ Category

Adjusting your status as an immigrant to the United States is an important process. Here you’ll find all of the information you need to navigate your immigration journey. Have you read our Adjustment of Status Overview yet?

03Apr2013

CBP to Automate the I-94 Arrival/Departure Record Process

To increase efficiency, reduce operating costs and streamline the admission process, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is automating Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record process.  CBP will no longer require international non-immigrant visitors to fill out a paper Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record upon arrival to the U.S. by air or sea. The traveler will be provided with a CBP admission stamp on their travel.

Read More »
05Dec2012

Philippine Customers: Order your Birth Certificate Online

A Birth Certificate from the Philippine Statistics Authority (PSA) is a vital record that establishes the birth of a child. It is an official form that gives details on the time and place of a person’s birth, and his or her name, sex, mother’s name and (usually) father’s name. The word “birth certificate” can refer to either the original document or a certified true copy of or representation of the original record of birth document.

Read More »
27Nov2012

Employment Verification Letter for Affidavit of Support

Obtaining an employment verification letter from the US citizen sponsor’s current employer is highly recommended when providing evidence and proof of income for your Affidavit of Support.
The employment verification letter should be original and printed on company letterhead.

Read More »
23Nov2012

Affidavit of Support for Spousal Visas and Adjustment of Status (I-864 series forms)

The Affidavit of Support is legally required for the petitioning sponsor for many family-based and some employment based immigrants to show the intending immigrant will have adequate means of support when planning to immigrate to the U.S.

Read More »
24Feb2012

Tracking your I-765, Application for Employment Authorization

No matter where you file your I-765, Application for Employment Authorization (also known as the Work Permit or EAD), all cards are created and mailed from the USCIS card production facility in Kentucky. In 2011, USCIS initiated the secure mail initiative in partnership with the United States Post Office (USPS).

Read More »
27Jan2011

Getting a Divorce Certificate in the Philippines

Divorce was recognized in the Philippines between March 11 1917 and August 29 1950; since the latter date courts have been empowered to grant legal separation (annulment) but not divorce. Even during the period of legal recognition divorces were rare in the Philippines because of limited legal grounds for granting divorces. Certified copies of the […]

Read More »
11Jan2011

What happens if the sponsor dies before the K-1 or K-3 recipient receives a green card?

In the case of a K-1 nonimmigrant who marries the petitioner within 90 days of admission, the K-1 nonimmigrant (and any K-2 children who are otherwise eligible) may obtain adjustment of status without the need for Form I-360 just as they would have been eligible for adjustment without Form I-130, if the petitioner had not died.

Read More »
03Aug2010

Does the Form I-134 or Form I-864, Affidavit of Support need to be notarized?

No. The sponsor just has to sign the form. You should know however, when the sponsor signs an Affidavit of Support form, he/she certifies that the information provided, transcript and/or photocopy of tax documentation is true and correct, under penalty of perjury.

Read More »
12Jun2010

Why Do K1 and K3 Visa Beneficiaries Receive a Conditional Green Card?

The two year conditional green card is a result of the Marriage Fraud Amendments of 1986 (IMFA).  At the time Congress was hearing testimony from U.S. citizens about numerous alien spouses who left their sponsor shortly after obtaining their green card.  There was also growing concerns about marriage for hire schemes where U.S. citizens were […]

Read More »
26May2010

How Long Can a Green Card Holder Stay Outside the United States?

As a permanent resident or conditional permanent resident you can travel outside the United States for up to 6 months without losing your green card. Staying outside the United States for more than 6 months but less than one year will subject you to additional questioning when you return to the United States but you are not required to have a Reentry Permit and shouldn’t have any problems getting back in.

Read More »
Page 6 of 7

Blog Categories